Offaly meat factory at centre of odour complaints

EPA says Rosderra must do more work at Edenderry plant

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Offaly meat factory at centre of odour complaints

Rosderra Meats appeared at Tullamore District Court

A MEAT company at the centre of odour complaints at its plant in Offaly has denied an EPA claim that it is required to carry out further works at the factory.

Following a guilty plea last November to charges relating to odour emissions, Rosderra Irish Meats was required to carry out specified works at its plant on Carrick Road, Edenderry.

If the works were completed, a fine of €1,000 would be imposed but if they were not completed and there was culpability on the part of the company, the fine would be €2,000.

When the matter came before Tullamore District Court for mention today (May 27), Diarmuid Collins, BL, for the EPA, said the background to the prosecution was that some residents had been experiencing an odour issue and to have that ameliorated, works were to be completed.

An odour abatement wastewater treatment plant was not yet properly online and was still being operated by a contractor who had to complete snagging work.

Mr Collins also said that in line with industry standard practice, there needed to be odour sampling carried out and modelling built up to ascertain how the new apparatus was operating.

He sought an adjournment to September because until those matters had been attended to the EPA would not be satisfied the works had been carried out.

William Fennelly, BL, for Rosderra, said it was the company's position that they had completed all 15 specified items of work as agreed with the EPA and the €1,000 fine could now be imposed.

He said the vast majority of the €1.5m contract price on the wastewater treatment plant had been paid over and it was in operation since February.

Mr Fennelly said that apart from one operative who was doing minor snagging work, the contractor was no longer involved in the project.

He said Rosderra was very confident about the installation it had done and sampling and modelling, which were not part of the specified works, would only be relevant if carried out during the summer when temperatures are high and issues of odour arise.

Replying, Mr Collins said there were ongoing issues with odour and ongoing complaints were being made in relation to odour.

He denied that the EPA were being difficult, saying they were trying their best to ameliorate the situation for residents living beside the plant.

Mr Collins suggested the adjournment would give the parties time to discuss the matter and reach an agreement.

Mr Fennelly said odour complaints formed no part of the works which Rosderra were required to carry out and any complaints related to an entirely different issue from the wastewater treatment plant.

Judge Bernadette Owens noted that the order in November had been made by Judge John King and issues arising from the undertaking given before him would have to go back to him.

She adjourned the matter to September 23 next for mention.