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21/09/2021

'Believe that it's going to happen' advises singing star

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There are certain artists who don't just fall into the category of 'gentleman' in the world of Irish music, but whose very names could well be used to define the term. And singer/songwriter  Marc Roberts is most definitely one of those artists. Simply put, if you were to name someone with a bad word to say about Marc, I'd name you two liars in return. And you'd be one of them. 

As well as sharing his own considerable talents with us over the years, Marc has also represented Ireland on the international stage, taking the song  Mysterious Woman  - written by Nathan Carter's manager (and no slouch himself in the songwriting department), John Farry - to within one place of glory in the 1997 Eurovision Song Contest. Not just someone who happens to make his living in the music business, Marc also harbours a deep appreciation for those whose musical gifts have graced the world. This sense of gratitude led to him recording the album  A Tribute to the Music of John Denver, with a live show performing the hits of the  Country Roads  legend also giving rise to 'full-house' signs going up at venues nationwide. In fact, that show even made it to Denver's hometown of Colorado. 

It was under Marc's expert guidance that Daniel O' Donnell himself first ventured into the realm of songwriting, something we'll come back to in much more detail during Part 2 of our chat. 

So, with all of the foregoing considered, it seems more than fitting - and especially given the monumental achievement of his fellow county-men in dethroning the Dubs at Croke Park last Saturday! - that we point the OTRT spotlight in the direction of this proud Mayo man this week. 

I had the pleasure of catching up with Marc a week or so ago, with the main reason for our chat being the release of his latest single,  CONSIDER IT DONE.  I asked Mark if that song was based on anything in particular from his own life, or was it more a case that he came up with the hook or a couple of good lines and just took it from there? 

"It's kind of a mixture, because the expression, 'consider it done', just came to me, and I thought, wow, that's catchy. But what could it mean, though? Then when I started to think about it, it's kind of like how your life progresses and the way you should think. The chorus is, "Sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride/ It's not how you look, but how you feel inside/ And if you need a helping hand, consider it done." Don't ever be afraid to ask for a helping hand. It's all about the whole idea that life is about choices. I was always torn between the expressions, 'Everything comes to he who waits', and then, 'He who hesitates is lost.' Because how can they both be right? 'Consider It Done' was on my first album, and for me at the time it was my perception of the business. How does it start...God, I'd need the guitar on my knee now to think of the lyrics [laughs]. 'When you sit and count the stars in the sky/ You want to touch them, but they're too damn high/ If you want the brightest star, consider it done.' Everything seems like, oh my God...how is this gonna happen? But if you have a bit of belief and faith in yourself and what you're doing, and you know it's right...then karma! It'll happen! If it's supposed to happen, it will happen. Consider it done." 

While I didn't realise that  Consider It Done  had also appeared on Marc's debut album, I did notice that it was also the title of his publishing company. So 'consider it done', as a phrase, obviously has a much deeper significance in Marc's life? 

"Well yeah, that's it. And that's the explanation for it. It's my publishing company, and our record label is C.I.D., which is also 'consider it done.' It's like a positive affirmation. If you want something, consider it done. Believe in it. Believe that it's going to happen, and have faith. The problem is a lot of us don't know what it is we want [laughs]. I think everybody is the same, no matter what walk of life you're in. You want something, whatever it is. But if you believe that it can happen, just believe in it, then consider it done. It will happen." 

Marc mentioned how he was always torn between the two phrases,  "He who hesitates is lost", and  "Everything comes to he who waits."  But of those two, which one did Marc himself tend to veer more towards, I wondered? 

"All my life it's been a mixture of both, and that's what always kind of confused me. How can they both be right? Everything comes to he who waits. So, if you sit back and wait for something to happen...allegedly it will happen. But I do believe that everything happens for a reason. People come into your life for a reason. Things happen in your life for a reason. So it would be more that than he who hesitates is lost. That used to always throw a spanner in the works for me. I used to try to figure out, well, if I hesitate too much...time is passing, life goes on, things change, everything changes. Music changes. Thankfully for me, that song still means as much to me as it did when I wrote it. And I see it in so many people, and it's such a positive affirmation to have. Just consider it done, whatever it is." 

Was there any particular reason why Marc wanted to bring the song back into the public arena right now?

"Because anytime that I performed it 'live', people loved it. And I wanted to bring it to a different audience. I got it remastered and edited for radio, so it sounds very much of what's happening now in lots of ways. It's very radio-friendly, and any presenter that's heard it has loved it. So thankfully, from that point of view, it's been playlisted everywhere, including RTE, which is great. It's a very polished production. It was Chris O' Brien and Graham Murphy that did it, and they're both Grammy nominees, as you know, for their production. And Billy Farrell, who I write with, and produces quite a lot of my stuff, is also a Grammy nominated producer, he mastered it for me. There's still a lot of people who hadn't heard, so to them it's a brand new song anyway." 

Consider It Done  is the follow up to Marc's previous single,  Don't Let The Sun Get In Your Eyes.  What process does Marc go through when he's considering a new release? 

"Well, to be honest with you, I'd normally be a bit more organised than I am now [laughs], but with the way things are with the pandemic...! 'Don't Let The Sun Get In Your Eyes' was a huge radio hit from our point of view, and again, it ticked a lot of boxes for me. It's a song that I was inspired to write by my niece and nephew when they were kids. And it all came from the way when you're a kid, and you know when you look up at the sun and you get tears in your eyes? And my wish for them was that the only time they'd have tears in their eyes was when they looked at the sun. So 'Don't Let The Sun Get In Your Eyes' was my little way of twisting it around and saying don't get those tears in your eyes. And again, the song was very much along the lines of something that you could live your life by, at any age. 'Let tears of joy be the only tears you cry/ May the universe guide you in everything you do/ 'Cause love will always see you through.' It goes on, 'Speak your mind, but listen when you've spoken/ Choose your words so no-one feels the pain/ Open your heart, although it may get broken/ Nothing ventured, nothing gained.' Again, it's saying to live your life in a positive way. Be good to people. You'll get it back tenfold. Help people whenever you can. And I've always lived my life by that. So that song was me telling them what I felt would help them in life." 

Even just listening to Marc speak about those two songs -  Consider It Done  and  Don't Let The Sun Get In Your Eyes  - and hearing him recite some of the lyrics, it really emphasises how philosophical a songwriter he seems to be. I asked Marc if he thought that was a fair observation? 

"Hmmm...I can be. Depending on the type of song. Those two songs, for instance, they almost wrote themselves, both of them. Because they'd be very much an extension of the way I would think. I wouldn't like to see myself pontificating to people that they should do this, or that. But it's to remind people that life is always full of choices. There's lots of things that you can do. If it can be half-full or half-empty, it's always better to be half-full. It's that kind of thing. You only have to listen to the younger artists now to realise  - and this is in general, in pop music, Ed Sherran, Tom Grennan, any of these guys - the lyrics are so important. I think people don't realise how important they are. It's not all about, 'I love you and you love me.' That's been done a million times. You have to find a different way of saying that, but still keeping the sentiment. I think, if you can make people think, you're halfway there. If it does nothing else but somebody gets something positive out of it... Usually people will just go, 'Ah it's a lovely song, I love the melody of it.' But then all of a sudden they'll come back and go, 'Wow, I was listening to the words!' It proves that the perfect marriage has to be both words and music. Words are so important. Down through the years, a lot of the time, they've become lost. And that's a pity, because they're very important." 

Given how hard the last seventeen or so months have been for the music, entertainment, and arts industries, did being a songwriter help Marc to get through it all? Was he able to fill some of that extra time writing, or, like a lot of songwriters, did he actually find it a hard time to write? 

"Good question. I've done some writing, but no more than I would have ever done. I'm not very regimented and orderly in that sense. It's hard to explain. I've never done a 9-to-5 writing job. I know that works for Gilbert O' Sullivan and Chris De Burgh, and people like that, and that's great. But I don't know, I kind of consider that too much like work! [Laughs]. I always used to write better when coming home from a gig, it could be three or four o' clock in the morning and there's nobody on the road, you have a coffee, and you take your time. Just empty your head of any thoughts, and that's when I get ideas. My only thing that I was very conscious of from the very beginning of Covid, was that I didn't want to write anything negative. I didn't want to write anything that was going to be very much of a pandemic type of song. Because we all just have had enough of it. We just want to get on with life. We want to get back to some semblance of normality. I wrote one with Charlie McGettigan, and in that one we actually went there. It's one called 'To Hold You Again.' We were both kind of thinking God, ya know there's people that would come to our gigs that we'd give a hug to at the end of it. And we were thinking if only we could get back to that person again, that would be an indication that things were normal! But, we'll just have to wait. I've always done a little bit of writing, the usual scribbling down little bits and singing my heart out into my phone. That's what I do. I've finished a song with Max T. Barnes, that's going to be a single soon."

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