Offaly native awarded cancer research grant

Irish Cancer Society Research Scholar, Patricia Cleary from Shinrone has received a new cancer research grant for her work at the annual Irish Cancer Society Research Awards Ceremony lastweek, where a major €3.1 million investment in cancer research was announced.

Irish Cancer Society Research Scholar, Patricia Cleary from Shinrone has received a new cancer research grant for her work at the annual Irish Cancer Society Research Awards Ceremony lastweek, where a major €3.1 million investment in cancer research was announced.

The grants were awarded by Today FM’s Ray D’Arcy at a ceremony which took place in Dublin. A total of eight Irish Cancer Society Research Scholars, four Research Fellows and four Prostate Cancer Researchers were announced at the ceremony that will ensure new research projects are commenced in breast, colorectal, ovarian, leukaemia, oesophageal, lung, prostate and metastatic cancers.

Patricia was awarded the grant for her research into how a specific molecule helps breast cancer cells to survive chemotherapy. This research, being undertaken at the National University of Ireland, Galway, may lead to new ways to improve patients’ response to chemotherapy.

On being awarded Research Scholar, Patricia commented, “I am delighted to receive this grant from the Irish Cancer Society for my research, and hope that this work can go towards helping those affected by cancer in the future.”

The Irish Cancer Society’s vision for cancer research centres on achieving world-class discoveries to improve outcomes for patients throughout Ireland. Over the past 30 years, cancer research funded by the Irish Cancer Society has led to major advances in cancer research and more than 650 important research findings have been discovered.

The 16 research awards span a wide range of areas that will investigate a number of potentially important discoveries.

Cancer is a major cause of death and disease in this country and each year there are over 30,000 new cases of cancer diagnosed as well as over 8,700 deaths. Cancer rates are expected to rise and it is estimated that by 2020, 40,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Ireland each year.Speaking at the ceremony, Professor John Fitzpatrick, Head of Research, Irish Cancer Society commented, “We are so proud to be announcing our next round of cancer researchers who we will now be supporting. The standard of research proposals was exceptionally high and after a rigorous review process conducted by our international expert panel, we are confident that the research that we are funding will contribute towards making significant advances in cancer research at national and international level”

John McCormack, CEO, Irish Cancer Society continued, “ Cancer currently affects one in three of us and with cancer rates on the rise research plays a vital role in the fight against it.

“However, as the largest voluntary funder of cancer research, the Irish Cancer Society is dependent on donations from the general public to help continue to fund the research programme. You can find out more about our research programme through our website www.cancer.ie .”