Offaly’s Katie helps launch Referendum Guide

OFFALY’S Katie Troy, a member of the Down Syndrome Ireland National Advisory Council, helped launch the Down Syndrome Ireland “Easy to Read” Children Referendum Guide on Monday, October 22 in Buswells Hotel, Dublin.

OFFALY’S Katie Troy, a member of the Down Syndrome Ireland National Advisory Council, helped launch the Down Syndrome Ireland “Easy to Read” Children Referendum Guide on Monday, October 22 in Buswells Hotel, Dublin.

The organisation has implemented this nationwide campaign to enable its members to exercise their constitutional right to vote in the forthcoming Children Referendum on Saturday, November 10.

Down Syndrome Ireland in consultation with its National Advisory Council has produced this “Easy to Read” document in response to its members and their families’ great difficulty in understanding and comprehending the contents of the National Referendum Commission’s Guide.

Commenting at the launch of the campaign, David O’Brien, Chairman of the Down Syndrome Ireland, National Advisory Council said, “Political decisions affect me as much as the next person. So it is very important that we understand the referendum wording.”

David went on to say that, “We have a right to vote and have our voice heard.”

Also commenting on the campaign, Pat Clarke, Chief Executive of Down Syndrome Ireland said, “People with Down Syndrome have the right to vote and this important document will provide the reader with the information needed to cast an informed vote. We are urging our members to inform themselves about the proposed change and to vote. It is our constitution and we as a nation have the power to decide whether or not to change it, but it is my understanding that there are distinct advantages for children with disabilities and their families if there is a yes vote on November 10.”

Down Syndrome Ireland celebrates its 41st anniversary this year. The organisation which has over 3,000 member families across 25 branches nationwide, is the largest organisation concerned with the welfare of people with a learning disability in Ireland.

Down Syndrome is 97% funded by voluntary contributions and events organised by its members.