Six Offaly projects qualify for BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition

Damian Moran

Reporter:

Damian Moran

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Six Offaly projects have qualified for the 50th BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition. Five schools are represented with two projexts from Tullamore College making the cut.

Six Offaly projects have qualified for the 50th BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition. Five schools are represented with two projexts from Tullamore College making the cut.

The projects cover a wide range of topics from Social Media usage, to the affects of Wind Turbine, to investigating the use of wireless sensor data to enhance martial arts performance.

John Corcoran and Ryan Heavin from Gallen Community School are entered in the Social and Behavioural Sciences Category and their project looks into ‘how Facebook affects our social lives away from the computer screen, on whether it makes us more socially active’.

With a project entitled ‘Gearduino’, Conor Walsh from Colaiste Choilm has designed an automatic gear system for bicycles controlled by a gearduino micro-controller.

A very topical project by Megan Addie from Oaklands College in Edenderry, which is entered in the Junior Social and Behavioural Sciences Category, will investigate if wind turbines affect people, animals or the environment.

The cleverly named project ‘To P or not to P’ by Daragh Fogarty of Tullamore College aims to develop an accurate, reliable and quick test kit to examine the Phosphorus levels of various foods, to aid Renal Dialysis Patients. The projeect is entered in the Senior Chemical, Physical & Mathematical Sciences Category.

Another topical project, again from Tullamore College and entered in the Technoloy Section is designed to detect even the slightest of leaks and prevent any water loss by shutting off the pipe at the valve. The team behind the project is Lorcan O’Rourke, Gavin Mooney and Emma Kirwan.

A project with a sporting emphasis comes from Jeremy Rigney in Banagher College and investigates if the use of wireless sensor data during training can be used to effectively increase athlete performance using force and accuracy of a Taekwondo punch.