Children criticise parents’ driving skills

NEARLY two thirds of children (63 per cent) admit their parents are aggressive drivers and 13 per cent say they are scared or embarrassed by Mum and Dad’s driving, according to new research.

NEARLY two thirds of children (63 per cent) admit their parents are aggressive drivers and 13 per cent say they are scared or embarrassed by Mum and Dad’s driving, according to new research.

The survey by Continental Tyres, asked 1,000 kids in the UK and Ireland to report what they witnessed and to say how they felt about their parents driving – and the results might make Mum and Dad think twice about their behaviour.

Three quarters of children between the ages of four and 16 who responded to the survey said their parents shouted at other road users and 20 percent reported that their “responsible adult” used a hand-held mobile phone while driving, despite this being against the law.

The poor driving skills prompt 22 per cent of children to slump down in their seat to try to hide and one in five have asked their elders to improve their driving.

Paddy Murphy from Continental Tyres Ireland said: “There are some serious failings highlighted here revealing poor driving practices and lack of courtesy by a lot of parents.

“What compounds that situation is the impact it has on the children. Nearly one in ten said they had gripped the seat in response to the speed of their parents driving.

“The assumption might have been that driving with a child in the car would prompt greater care and attention, but this evidence suggests not, and poor driving habits are potentially being ingrained in future motorists.”

In the study 23 per cent of the children said that they had been in an accident with either Mum or Dad driving (Mum 13 percent; Dad 10 percent).

According to four out of five kids (80 per cent), Dad is more likely to speed and is also more likely to be aggressive.

In a lot of cases, it appears that the combustible mix of Mum and Dad can be worse when both are together. Two thirds of parents argue about each other’s driving and their offspring rate them both as better drivers when their partner is not in the car.

Paddy Murphy of Continental commented: “Parents are normally very aware of the need to be good role models; this survey reminds them of the need to continue this when they get behind the wheel.”